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Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies

The Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies is a teaching-and-research institute within Notre Dame's Keough School of Global Affairs dedicated to the study and understanding of Irish culture—in Ireland and around the world—in all of its manifestations. Since its inception in the 1993-1994 academic year with the Donald and Marilyn Keough Program in Irish Studies, the Institute has assembled superior faculty and library collections. From the arrival on campus of Seamus Deane as Donald and Marilyn Keough Chair of Irish Studies in 1992, the Keough-Naughton Institute has focused on bringing outstanding educators, political leaders, writers, musicians, and other visitors to campus in an effort to "bring Ireland to Notre Dame." We foster exchanges between Notre Dame and Ireland to make direct experiences available to our students and to "bring Notre Dame to Ireland." With such initiatives as the landmark, award-winning documentary 1916 The Irish Rebellion and the annual IRISH seminar, the Institute is also focused on "bringing Ireland to the world."

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Thanks To Our Supporters!

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Description

The Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies is a teaching-and-research institute within Notre Dame's Keough School of Global Affairs dedicated to the study and understanding of Irish culture—in Ireland and around the world—in all of its manifestations. Help "bring Notre Dame to Ireland."

Donations are applied to...

During this year's ND Day, donations will be applied to undergraduate courses that will bring students to Ireland and Northern Island. This means creating new courses and supporting existing courses to go as often as they plan.

Why are donations necessary?

Donations are necessary because funds are currently not able to fill the need for the frequency and diversity of courses that bring students to Ireland.